Getting A Cat2017-12-02T22:43:48+00:00

Getting A Cat – A Checklist Before You Buy That Pet!

Here’s a really useful list of things to think about before you get a kitten or cat.

Work through this with the whole family and it will improve your chances of a happy life with your new cat. It can also introduce children to responsible pet ownership

Just two quick pages is all that stands between you and the right cat.

Pets Australia members can LOG IN to access this checklist and all the information they need to get the right cat, get the right advice and go into a store of shelter armed with information they need.

Here’s a really useful list of things to think about before you get a kitten or cat.

Work through this with the whole family and it will improve your chances of a happy life with your new cat. It can also introduce children to responsible pet ownership.

Just two quick pages is all that stands between you and the right cat!

The information provided below is a referance from Pets Australia. You can join Petsaustralia.org today, to find more handy information.

1. What can we offer this cat?

Ask not what you can your cat do for you, but what you can do for your cat” was famously not said by JFK, but it can avoid heartbreak later.

Insert your answers below:

Are we honestly prepared to keep this cat indoors 100% of the time? ___________

If NO, look at another pet. Recent research is showing that indoor cats not only make better pets and don’t hunt wildlife, but are less prone to severe injury, poisonings and neighbour complaints. “Catmax” enclosures are counted as “indoors”.

Can we really, honestly exercise this pet daily? ___________________

If NO, take a look at other pets, perhaps fish, reptiles or mice. Cats need playtime with owners to make great pets.

Can we really, honestly give this cat hugs and cuddles daily? __________________

If NO, another pet may be a better companion for your family. Cats certainly don’t need the level of social contact that dogs do to be happy, but they do need some attention particularly for some of the personality types.

Can we really, honestly afford to provide this cat with veterinary treatment in emergencies up to $2000?  ____________________________________________

If NO, see if you can afford pet insurance, or consider a pet that requires less veterinary treatment such as fish

Can we really, honestly, afford to have this cat groomed professionally? _________

If NO, consider a short haired breed or a breed you can groom yourself with proper training.

Are we really, honestly, going to have this cat desexed? _________________

If NO, consider another pet – fish, reptiles, birds.

Is our housing situation really stable enough that we can take the cat anywhere we move to? __________________________________________________

If NO, try another pet or wait until your housing situation is stable. Tenants moving house is one of the leading causes of surrenders to shelters, broken hearts and euthanasia of beautiful, loved cats.

If you have answered the above truthfully, you now know whether a cat or kitten is the right choice for you. If it is, proceed to the steps below.

2. Are we going to get a kitten or an adult? 

Kittens are cute and you can socialise them to accept handling, bathing and lots of different foods. However, cats over 6 months of age can be assessed for “feline-ality” and you can match your family style much better with the cat’s style. (See “cat personality” sheets). Adults may also be already desexed, and have any health issues resolved.

3. Are we going to get a male or a female? 

If you already have a cat, consider getting the other gender although this is no guarantee that the cats will “get on” as it is more a matter of individual style. Males are cheaper to desex, but may have a tendency to spray and be more independent.

4. What breed/s shall we get?

This will depend on your answers to the above and there are excellent websites that can help you sift through the more than 50 breed types.

Answers can be grouped into three groups

  • Purebred (insert breed);

  • Crossbreed/unknown – often of mixed parentage, often from shelters or accidental breeding, these pets often have excellent temperaments to make up for unsophisticated looks.

And three coat types

  • long hair

  • medium hair

  • short hair

Long and medium hair cats require a genuine commitment to grooming at least weekly. If you choose “Don’t care, depends on the TYPE” (see below) then you are a candidate to make the life of a shelter pet happier and more meaningful.

5. What TYPE of cat shall we get? 

Consider “shy” “assertive”, “energetic”, “amiable”, “dominant”, “reserved”, “relaxed” as well as those types in between. These are not only breed characteristics, they are also found within breeds as well.

“Type testing” is done routinely at many shelters, and can also be done by many veterinarians, breeders and behaviourists. One US organisation has identified 9 different cat behaviour types, and there is one to suite your needs.

It’s also worth assessing your family and choose the type to suit – is your family energetic?, dominant?, “couch potatoes”? , Do you have lots of friends visiting with dogs? Are you more the “one on one” type? Will the cat go everywhere with you?

Matching the family to the actual pet is the best indicator of a successful relationship.

The following artical above was shared from Pets Australia.

This advice is of a general nature and is not a substitute for professional assistance. For issues with your pet always seek a vet advice.

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